Craytulus, Athanasius And Kristos

 

Aristotle [384-322 BCE], National Museum, Athens.

In old Athens, they were giving Aristotle, the founder of Classical Logic, a hard time.

The philosophers in the generation before Aristotle, more alert to the Self-Loop, refused to give the Principle of Contradiction the status of ‘Law’.

And this, Aristotle thought was just not fair. [Modern Scientists and Philosophers are made of tougher stuff. They don’t wait for approval from any Village-Elder.]

In Metaphysics, Aristotle complains:

Those who are genuinely perplexed believe…[the] co-presence of contraries is an elementary fact..

So Anaxagoras declares everything to be mingled in everything else.. Democritus too says that the Void and the Plenum are alike present in any part..

Empedocles say’s: ‘As men themselves changed, so came a corresponding change of mind.’ Homer too is said apparently to have held the same opinion.

Parmenides declares himself..in the same way: ‘What fills [Man’s] body fills his thought.’

Xenophanes [who was the teacher of Parmenides] seems not to have understood..material or formal explanation, but gazing at the whole sky says: ‘Unity is God!’.

And from this conviction there blossomed the most extreme of their doctrines, the philosophy of Heraclitus as held by Cratylus, who finally thought one ought not to speak at all, but simply pointed his finger and censured Heraclitus for saying that it is impossible to step into the same river twicefor he himself believed that one could not do so even once.’

Athanasius of Alexandria [296-373]


Opening the First Synod of Nicaea in 325 A.D. Athanasius declared: ‘God became man in order that man becomes God’.

Jesus is not just a historical [Yeshua, Lesus, Joshua] or mythical [Mashiah, Kristos, Christ] figure. Jesus is not even a simple idea. Jesus in fact, is a defiant contradiction. For ‘Jesus’, it said: ‘is both God and Man.’

The first Synod of Nicaea was the first Ecumenical meeting of the Catholic Church, under Constantine, whose own conversion elevated an heretofore obscure persecuted cult to an empire-spanning faith propagated under a Pax Romana.

This seminal idea was later elaborated in mythic language by the Kabbalah of the Sephardic Jews, and is at the core of denouement in every mystical parallel of Abrahamic Religions.

Athanasius’ proclamation was a provocatively incorrect stance for a man of the Church. He was not granted an easy passage. A charged debate ensued and it was finally [but not unanimously] agreed that a new major doctrine that ironed out various conflicting minor anomalies was indeed needed.

And the new doctrine said:‘Christ was of one substance with the Father’

To be a True Christian is to be able to ride that contradiction and allow it to take you where it will. Else you can jump and grab one end of the binary tail and be done with it. And who would choose ‘Man’ over ‘God’? 

The Creed of Nicaea was the first uniform statement of doctrine for the Catholic Church. Much of the mountainous pile of later theological writing focused on making sensible this and other irritating antinomies that kept erupting, sneaking their way past the stern guards stationed at the door of orderly Church interpretation.

[Naturally, this leads to even greater absurdity: ‘How many angels can dance on the head of a pin?’]