The Axioms Of Sight And Darśana: ‘To SEE’

 

Holmes2

‘Holmes and Watson’, Richard Gutschmidt, 1906

 

‘How often have I said to you [Watson], that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth’.

Arthur Conan-Doyle: ‘The Sign of Four’ [1890]


Step into your bathroom. Turn on the lights. Wipe mirror with a damp cloth. Look. Do you see your eye? Of Course you do. But what you don’t see is the source of your vision.

In fact, what you see in the mirror cannot be the source of your vision. In fact, it can be anything but the source of your vision.

Your source of vision may never see itself.

Furthermore, and of equal importance:

Anything you see as the source of your vision, by that very fact, is confirmed as not being the source of your vision.

These are the Axioms of Sight. There are no claims of error in which I can have greater conviction.

[Note that these Axioms of Sight precede and preempt the Axioms of Formal Logic which originate in primary ontological assumptions such as an existent, independent, separated ‘Self’.]


Darśana, is from the Sanskrit root: dṛś, literally,To See’. The Sanskritic analogue of the Greek Phílosophía [‘Lover of Wisdom’] is the Seer: ‘One who See’s’.

One loves Wisdom of course, but it is not settled until one ‘Sees’. Argument is docked on assumption, Faith on belief. One can question it; reroute the inference; toss-up diversionary flak. But it’s a lot harder to ‘Unsee’ what you ‘See’. All orthodox Hindu schools of Philosophy are officially Darśanas.

Shūnyam as its translated expression ‘Absolute Absence’ implies, is not a relational term. It is ‘Seen’. You don’t think about it, conceptualize or imagine it, all things done within the aegis of the Two-ness Template.

‘Seeing’ in its analytic meaning is is all about catching the beam in your own eye. I catch the beam in my eye: and catch myself catching myself; and catch myself catching myself catching myself. And so on.

I look in a mirror and see my eye. I see my eye seeing my eye. I see my eye seeing my eye seeing my eye..

I see my Mind seeing my Mind. I catch my Thought catching my Thought. I Know. I Know that I Know. I Know that I Know that I Know…

This can get a little more loopy when the high inferential abstractions of Logic and Language are at play. Try your hand at: ‘All Words are Meaningless’-itself an expression in words. Or: ‘I don’t Exist!’

Darśana is the ‘Backward Step’, anInfinite Regress’ back to ‘True Nothing’ 


There are levels and levels of ‘Seeing’. For a pious Hindu, to see the adorned deity with a full and sincere heart is in turn to be seen by the deity in an act of divine grace [and often, such simple piety trumps all philosophy and metaphysics].

Watch out, though. Sanskrit Literature carries a long list of exclusive sightings made over the centuries by God-Men and Knaves. Each is raised up the flagpole and if anyone salutes a new school is born. All orthodox schools are officially Darśanas.

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